Esophageal Cancer – What Happens After 5 Years

http://youtu.be/J1HeWAhUU9k http://www.dailyrx.com/ Reaching the five-year milestone after surgery to treat esophageal cancer is cause for celebration. And many patients may be reaching this milestone. A new study found that survival up to 15 years was high in patients who had surgery for locally advanced esophageal cancer and lived at least five years. But these patients showed continual risk for cancer recurrence and other health issues. Brendon M. Stiles, MD, of Weill Cornell Medical College and New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, led this study. Dr. Stiles and team studied the health records of over 350 patients who had locally advanced esophageal cancer. Esophageal cancer is a cancer of the esophagus, which carries food from the mouth to the stomach. The median age of these patients was 64. All of the patients had surgery to remove the portions of the esophagus that were cancerous. Five years after surgery, 41 percent of these patients were still alive. In those patients who survived for five years after surgery, 89 percent were still alive after seven years. After 10 years, 73 percent were still alive, while 57 percent were still alive after 15 years. Dr. Stiles and team found that 23 percent of the five-year survivors developed recurrent esophageal cancer (cancer that came back). Most of the recurrences (75 percent) happened within five years of the initial surgery. About 33 percent of those who had recurrent cancer survived to 10 years after surgery. "The annualized risk of recurrence was 1.4 percent per year until year 10," Dr. Stiles said in a press release. Dr. Stiles and team said esophageal cancer patients should be monitored for at least 10 years after surgery due to the risk of recurrence.